Flashback: A car-bomb attack blown up US Embassy in Beirut in 1983

07/03/2018

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A terribly traumatic event took place on October the 23rd, 2010 when the U.S Marine Corps was hit by a vehicle loaded with more than 2000 pounds of explosive.
 A terribly traumatic event took place on October the 23rd, 2010 when the U.S Marine Corps was penetrated by a vehicle loaded with nearly a ton of explosives. There were more than two hundred soldiers killed that day, at the Beirut International Airport of Lebanon. The tragedy did not stop there. A French's military base was attacked by a second bomber only a few minutes later and nearly 60 more people were killed. It is unsure whether those tragic incidents had anything to do with the fact that the American forces did not retaliate and left Lebanon a few months later.
 
The U.S Embassy in Beirut on October 23, 1983 before the tragic car bomb attack
The U.S Embassy in Beirut on October 23, 1983 before the tragic car bomb attack  
 
It was 6:30 a.m on October the 23rd, 1983. Suddenly a Mercedez Benz rushed through the thick fence outside the American base and broke past 2 guard terminals, before hitting the main barracks and exploded. It was so strong that some witnesses report that the detonation jerk the whole building up for a few seconds before bringing it down brutally, leaving behind many people in a cloud of dust and crumbling concrete. In a report published by the FBI, they reveal that it was, to that day, the strongest non-nuclear detonation since 1945 and also the strongest car-bomb explosion in the history.
 
The U.S Embassy in Beirut after the tragic car bomb attack
The detonation jerk the whole building up for a few seconds before bringing it down brutally
 
But why were the Americans and the French in Lebanon in the first place? Actually, the Soldiers in Beirut are on a duty to arrange a peace between two warring parties, the Christian and Muslim Lebanese factions. Their presence is a part of an international peacekeeping treaty.  The American's role is the supervisor of the whole progress. First, the Palestine Liberation Organization withdrew from Beirut, followed by the American troops. They came back again in the following year to solve another issue - more than one thousands Palestinian were murdered by a Lebanese gang. They resided in an old army barracks of Isareal, located near the airport. The place is reinforced with walls so thick that it could seemingly withstand even a nuclear blast. After the car-bombing incident at the U.S embassy in April, they get out of the barrack unharmed, and their fence and walls were merely damaged.
 
President of the United States of the time, Ronald Reagan, described the tragedy as "inhuman" and vowed to never withdraw their troops until a lasting peace is forged. He showed his dedication by planning to bomb the headquarter of the terrorist group Hezbollah, the Hezbollah Training Camp, where the attack was planned. Later that year, the mission was canceled by Caspar Weinberger,  the Secretary of Defense, because he thought that would hurt the relationship with Arab nations. Finally, the last American troop got out of Lebanon in February.
 
The U.S Embassy in Beirut after the tragic car bomb attack
The US Embassy to Beirut was now a cloud of dust and crumbling concrete after the bomb attack
 
But these were not the first car bomb. The first one took place in mid-September, in the year 1920 outside the J.P Morgan Company in NY. It was planned and executed by Italian rebel -  Mario Buda, in the hope that the bomb would kill Morgan. He was very fortunate to be out of town at that time, but not so much for others 40 people. After that, some car-bomb attacks happened around the world, in Saigon in 1952 and Parlemo in 1963. Still, bombing using vehicles is still unfavored amongst terrorist gangs. But 1970 and 1980 were particularly terrifying where Hezbollah and some Irish gangs started to employ the car-bomb method.
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