How to drive a manual car: 5 things to avoid

04/12/2018 Same topic: Handy maintenance tips
Are you in these bad habits when driving a manual car?

A manual transmission (also dubbed “stick shift”) is a classic way of shifting gears. Driving a manual car brings you lots of advantages: faster acceleration and fuel economy for instances. So, how to drive a manual car?

Theoretically, riding this type of car allows you to control over the gear changes, meaning you can change gears any time. Controlling a manual vehicle is somewhat difficult at the start, yet once you’re used to it, it’s quite easy to maneuver. Here are several things you should avoid to be a skillful manual driver.

5 Things to Avoid When Driving a Manual Car

>>> Manual drivers vs automatic drivers: Who are better?

1. Use gear knob as hand rest

Many Nigerian drivers have a bad habit of resting their hand on the gear knob when driving without awareness of what is happening in the transmission system. A manual transmission is made up by numerous components including pressure plate, rotating collar, fly wheel, clutch plate and a selector fork with their own particular functions. Placing your hand on the gear lever while changing gears can make the fork touch the rotating collar that may cause the fork’s premature damage. For this reason, it’s better to put your hand back on the steering wheel after changing gears. Besides, we’d recommend you to hold the steering wheel with two hands for better control over your manual vehicle.

manual car shift knob

Many Nigerian drivers have a bad habit of resting their hand on the gear knob when driving

2. Use clutch biting point on incline

The biting point is the point where the clutch engages with the fly wheel. You can know you’re on a biting point when a strange sound comes from your engine due to the revs dropping or when you feel a small amount of lift at the front of your vehicle. When on an inclined surface (climbing bridges for example), it’s a terrible idea to use the clutch biting point technique to prevent the vehicle from rolling back. The reason is that the spinning clutch’s speed trying to match the speed of the spinning flywheel can make the clutch prematurely worn out. For that case, you should use the handbrake alternatively.

clutch biting point

The biting point is the point where the clutch engages with the fly wheel

3. Constantly rest foot on clutch pedal

Parking your foot constantly on the clutch pedal results in it being partially engaged then bound to wear off. Other than that, this also devastates the throw out bearings, which may be partly in contact with the diaphragm bearing.

manual car with dead pedal

It’s a good habit to completely remove your foot from the clutch after you change gears

Thus, it’s a good habit to completely remove your foot from the clutch after you change gears and place your foot on the dead pedal instead.

4. Keep your car in gear at a stop

Doing this when driving a manual car may lead to premature damage to the throw out bearing too. Therefore, it is advisable to keep your vehicle in neutral.

>>> Read also: Top 6 manual transmission equipped cars you would love to drive

5. Engage incorrect gear to gain speeds

Driving a manual car at a high gear but at slow speeds can strain the engine. On the other hand, driving at an average speed and remaining a low rpm can help you save fuel.

a car on the road

It’s required to always progress through the gears in case you want to accelerate your car

To protect your car engine from straining, it’s required to always progress through the gears in case you want to accelerate your car. At the same time, neither overly revving the engine nor reaching the red line on the rev meter is recommended. To gain speeds, it’s wiser to drop gear, accelerate and change gear.

>>> Read more useful car tips and advice on Naijauto.com

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