How do potholes damage your car?

04/08/2021

Posted by: Joshua-Philip Okeafor

Share this post:

Latest news articles

How do potholes damage your car, you may be asking? Well, with the rains here again, this is something you should be asking. Dive deep to see the answers and how you can keep the damage minimal. Read more now!

Introduction

It's currently the rainy season, which implies that the pothole period has arrived. You'll inevitably encounter one of these obnoxious highway obstructions, no matter how hard you try to stop them.

What exactly are they and how do potholes damage your car? Potholes are collapsed, broken sections of the asphalt caused by water weakening the surface underneath the pavement. Early in the spring, as temperatures begin to vary wildly, potholes are particularly severe.

potholes-and-cars

Potholes are the silent killers on the roads for cars and people

Potholes are all science

When you go back to secondary school science lessons, you recall you learned that as water grows cold, it spreads. When water seeps through the soil under the lane, it freezes and bumps up onto the surface, creating potholes. When the water warms up, the elevated surface continues, leaving a void between the asphalt and the earth. The concrete surface breaks and sinks in after a vehicle runs over it.

The mixture of rain, dew, and moisture, as well as the force of busy traffic, produces a broken highway. Your car is, therefore, more vulnerable to harm as a result of this. Pothole vandalism costs Nigerian drivers a lot of money, studies have shown.

So, when you get out on the highway, keep in mind the possible implications and damage brought about by potholes to your vehicle.

What causes potholes?

Potholes are a form of road defect that develops when the soil under the pavement becomes undermined or displaced. Potholes are most likely to occur on highways in the rainy season when a lot of rushing water damages the foundation layers under the surface.

The ground deforms, breaks, whittling away as cars drive through these vulnerable points, leaving a crater in the asphalt. Potholes begin small but increase in size as traffic moves by, possibly being deep or wide enough to inflict vehicle damage.

What are the Effects of Pothole Damage on Cars?

Tires

Potholes will put a lot of strain on your tires, so start by making sure your car has the best tires on the roads. Potholes, which are sunken bits of gravel with sharp points, can split rubber and even crack the adhesive that binds the tire components together when you hit them. Recall they are the parts of the car that actually touch the road.

Check the tires for apparent signs of tire damage, such as tread splitting, sidewall bulges, and flats, if you happen to strike a pothole. Bring your car to Virginia Tire & Auto if you're uncertain. They will check it thoroughly.

tire-of-car

Your tires take a pounding every time they encounter a pothole

Car exhaust

A car will “bottom out” in especially deep potholes. This indicates the exhaust system will come into contact with the ground, possibly tearing the piping apart. When driving, listen for odd sounds that could mean that the exhaust pipes have been damaged and need fixing.

Car body

It's unusual for the car's body to come into contact with the earth. Once it refers to potholes, though, it is probable. When you hit a crack, your car's bumpers and sides can be cracked or smashed.

And if the bulk of the damage is superficial, it's still an expensive patch if you'd like to keep your car looking fine. Potholes are most likely to do aesthetic damage to sleeker vehicles that are closer to the pavement.

wrecked-cars

These cars are feeling sorry for themselves, right?

The suspension

Abrupt shocks to your vehicle's suspension and steering mechanisms will cause alignment issues and damage to your suspensions, struts, and wheel bearings.

Suspension is the mechanism that attaches the car's tires to the rest of the body. If your car pulls to one side randomly, and your steering wheel vibrates, or your wheel isn't balanced when going straight, you might have a misaligned vehicle. This is incredibly risky and has to be dealt with right away.

Please remember that newer cars are built to accommodate the misalignment's tug. This implies that your car's alignment can be out of whack without giving you any warning signals, and you'll only find it if you have a laser alignment system. Learn to notice warning signs that your shocks are failing.

Your car wheels

When you run across a pothole, the wheel rims can be damaged, resulting in chips, holes, and twisted rims. When the broken wheel can't form a stable seal with the tires or isn't rolling easily, this becomes a challenge.

Get your wheels tested by tire specialists to see whether you need some rim restoration work if the tire is lacking air pressure or your drive sounds off.

A collision with a pothole will also pose a risk to the wheel bearings. Bearings are assemblages of tiny steel balls held together by a metal ring known as a race. They allow your automobile to move from left to right by allowing your wheels to spin effectively with very little friction.

It's obvious that being unable to steer your car is a major issue. If you begin to hear grinding sounds as you rotate your steering, your bearings might have been broken.

man-fixes-car-wheels

Wheels can get seriously damaged by potholes

What effects do potholes have on drivers?

Potholes are well-known for wreaking havoc on automobiles. Annually, Nigerian drivers spend billions, or about thousands per person, to repair vehicle damage inflicted by potholes. Worse, many cars experience pothole issues every rainy season or period, necessitating almost regular pothole fixes. Also, drivers witness longer travel times because of these obstructions.

car-stops-for-pothole

A car has to slow down for a pothole, increasing travel times

>>> You may also like to read: Dangers of floodwater & How to drive safely through floods

What effect do potholes have on the country?

Of course, it costs a lot to maintain roads adequately, and potholes mean the government spends huge amounts yearly just fixing the cracks and craters on the road. Since many drivers allege that potholes (or dodging them) are a major cause of road accidents in the country, this is an issue the government needs to take seriously.

How to deal with potholes

The best way to deal with a pothole is not to deal with it, meaning repair or reconstruction. But in the event that the local or state government in your area is still dragging its feet, there are some remedies to manage the problem. They include:

  • Drive slowly on bad roads as the effects of a pothole are seriously magnified when you hit one at top speeds.

  • Make sure you have good, strong tires. Having bad tires robs your car of the first and initial buffer between the pothole and your vehicle.

  • Keep your suspension in great condition. The shocks transfer most of the effects of the pothole inward by absorbing the trauma. But guess what? No good shocks, no absorption.

car-inside-pothole

Deal with a pothole as you deal with fire ... very carefully

See the video below to bring home to you the horrors of a pothole on you and your car:

Car hitting potholes(#18)

Conclusion

How do potholes damage your car? We hope you have answers to this question as well as solutions to deal with the problem. Enjoy your driving this season and stay safe.

>>> More normal and exotic safety driving tips here

How do you deal with a pothole?

Do potholes cause car accidents?

What are potholes?

Joshua-Philip Okeafor

Joshua-Philip Okeafor

Car buying & selling

Joshua, or KK as friends call him, is a Filmmaker, Writer and Director. A Christian, Joshua is a product of Nigeria’s foremost film school, the National Film Institute, Jos, where he majored in Writing/Directing. Joshua began his writing career at age 18 when an older brother gave him a four page outline of a children novel. Joshua intends to keep writing and directing. His screen name is sometimes Joshua Kalu Ephraim (Writing), and sometimes Joshua KK (directing).

See more